Clean Water Nias, Indonesia

There is no vehicle access to this village.  Visitors must hike for 2 hours along a dirt track (after an arduous 4 wheel drive trip).  Families in this village of 1,000 must walk 2km just to collect water.

The project is a collaborative effort. The villagers provide labour and local materials such as sand and gravel. Surfaid and Jord will provide tanks, cement, piping and the technical expertise required to enable the works to be completed.

In time, Jord staff will have a chance to visit Nias, to provide first hand support to Surfaid. For those so inclined, there’s also an opportunity to find some remote, isolated surf breaks.

Visit www.surfaid.org to learn more about this fine organisation that Jord is delighted to support.

“Even today, some residents still live in tents provided by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Indeed, although money continues to dribble in, damaged government offices and school buildings remain unrepaired; and many of those who lost their means of livelihood are still struggling to find steady work.

There is so much still needing to be done that sometimes it can be overwhelming. On the other hand, it offers a great opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives.

So what can be done? Health and sanitation projects, especially the provision of clean and safe drinking water through building artesian wells. Solar power to provide homes and streets with lighting. Computers and internet connectivity for schools to give students access to knowledge that a lot of others take for granted. Technological and financial support for projects like hydroponic and aquaculture, to provide families with sustainable and eco-friendly sources of livelihood. This will allow them to provide for their own needs, without relying on hand outs and the goodness of other people’s hearts.”

Jord thanks Jessie, for continuing to care and for helping to keep the flame of hope burning in others.


Habitat restoration in remote South Australia

Boolcoomatta is an ex-sheep station, established way back in 1840. Explorer Douglas Mawson undertook a number of studies there, before his more famous adventures in Antartica in the early 1900s. In its heyday, this massive 600 square kilometre station used to shear 100,000 sheep a year. Whilst it brought great prosperity to the region for many years, farming this fragile environment eventually took its toll, and the property’s commercially viability diminished.

Bush Heritage Australia purchased Boolcoomatta in 2006 and is painstakingly restoring the land to its original condition. Gone are the sheep, the goats, the pigs and many of the feral cats. Native fauna and flora is beginning to regenerate.

Water security is a major concern on this station, located some two hours four wheel drive west of Broken Hill. In 2014, Jord provided funding and engineering services to help overcome this challenge. The project involved the design and supply of various solar-powered pumps, rainwater tanks and piping to provide a combination of rain and bore water storage and supply facilities.

In October 2015, a dozen Jord staff enjoyed a long weekend on the property, engaging in some bush regeneration activities and experiencing first hand just how bountiful yet fragile Australia’s outback is.


Clean Energy Cravens Peak Wilderness Queensland, Australia

Cravens Peak was singled out by the World Wildlife Fund as one of the top nature reserves in Australia. Located some 500 km south of Mt Isa, Bush Heritage Australia purchased this 2,300 km2 property on the northern edge of the Simpson Desert in 2005. Its red sandy dune fields, semi-permanent waterholes, Coolabah woodlands, and gibber plains boasts one of the richest reptile assemblages on earth.

While marginal and unpredictable for agricultural production, the relatively moist and fertile dune swales and temporary waterbodies are an important oasis, providing refuge to many desert animals that retreat in the dry times from the desert proper. A large number of regional and international migrant waterbirds follow seasonal rains to make the most of sudden bursts of productivity.

In 2015, Jord’s JET trust funded the installation of a 10 kW solar powered energy system to provide the necessary power that allows Bush Heritage residents and visiting scientists to conduct station management and research projects in relative comfort.


Clean Water Bon Bon Reserve, South Australia

It’s hard to get your head around the scale of Bon Bon Station Reserve, an old sheep station south of Coober Pedy in South Australia. The reserve sits between the Great Victoria Desert and the large saltpan lakes of Eyre, Torrens and Gairdner, which are so big you can see them from space. At around 70 kilometres long and 30 across, it is the size of Sydney.

At its heart is Lake Puckridge, which fills up with water around once a decade and can run to seven metres deep. The lake’s wetlands system attracts large numbers of waders and waterbirds, including black-winged stilts, red-necked avocets and grey teals.

In 2014, JET funded a project to upgrade the water treatment and storage capability of the staff quarters. The project included the cleaning and bacterial decontamination of an old bore system, 1.5km of piping, water storage tanks and installation of telemetry equipment for automated pump operation.


Typhoon Yolanda, Philippines

Catastrophic events are quick to make headlines, get global support for the first few weeks, but are often soon forgotten. We take this opportunity to tell a good story about one Jord staff member’s selfless and relentless effort to keep a flame of hope in others burning.

In November 2013 super typhoon Yolanda – the strongest typhoon recorded in Philipino history – left at least 10,000 killed.

Jord Group Compliance Manager Jessie Salazar spearheaded a campaign for Jord to help give immediate assistance to people left homeless and destitute in the town of Tacloban. Our JET donation was delivered direct to recipients, in collaboration with the Red Cross, via some of our staff volunteering their time to distribute food and other essential items.

Some two years after the event, Jessie continues to devote much of her spare time in supporting ongoing rehabilitation efforts. She travels regularly to Tacloban and provides the following report from her latest visit.

“Even today, some residents still live in tents provided by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Indeed, although money continues to dribble in, damaged government offices and school buildings remain unrepaired; and many of those who lost their means of livelihood are still struggling to find steady work.

There is so much still needing to be done that sometimes it can be overwhelming. On the other hand, it offers a great opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives.

So what can be done? Health and sanitation projects, especially the provision of clean and safe drinking water through building artesian wells. Solar power to provide homes and streets with lighting. Computers and internet connectivity for schools to give students access to knowledge that a lot of others take for granted. Technological and financial support for projects like hydroponic and aquaculture, to provide families with sustainable and eco-friendly sources of livelihood. This will allow them to provide for their own needs, without relying on hand outs and the goodness of other people’s hearts.”

Jord thanks Jessie, for continuing to care and for helping to keep the flame of hope burning in others.